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Sourdough Starter

 £ 4.99+PP

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Ready to bake?

If you’re not ready to start baking, the starter can be stored for years in its dried state.

When you are ready, you’ll need to activate the starter and feed it until it's ready for baking.

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It takes 4 days to get your starter ready for baking

Instructions for your starter:

It takes 4 days to get your starter ready for baking

Instructions for your starter

Rye Starter

You will need

  • dried starter
  • lukewarm water
  • flour
    (strong white bread flour or plain flour)
  • a storage container
    (with transparent sides is best)
  • with a lid
    (just use cling film if no lid)

Activation

Day 1

In a pot, soak the dried starter in 20g of lukewarm water for a few minutes to soften. Stir in 20g of flour (organic is best as it contains more natural yeasts) and 25g of water. Cover and let it sit for 24 hours in a warm spot.

Day 2

Stir in 25g flour and 30g of lukewarm water, cover and let it sit for another 24 hours in the same place.

Day 3

Stir in 50g more of flour and 75g of lukewarm water. Within 12 – 24 hours you should see bubbles appearing and it should start to smell a bit fruity.

Day 4

Stir in 100 grams of flour and 150 grams of lukewarm water. Within about 12 hours you should have a lively starter that is ready for baking.

Maintaining the rye starter

Continue to build the starter with daily feedings until you have a quantity to use for baking.

Aim to have 200 – 300g of starter available.

You can double or triple the quantity of starter with each feeding. Using a ratio of 1.5 weight of water to rye flour gives good consistency. You’re aiming for a consistency like porridge. Add a splash more flour or water if required. If you don’t know when you’re next going to be baking, store the starter in the fridge and feed it every few days. Tip half of the starter away and then feed it as normal.

Here’s a handy guide for when to feed your starter:   should-i-feed-my-sourdough-starter

white Starter

You will need

  • dried starter
  • lukewarm water
  • flour
    (strong white bread flour or plain flour)
  • a storage container
    (with transparent sides is best)
  • with a lid
    (just use cling film if no lid)

Activation

Day 1

In a pot, soak the dried starter in 20g of lukewarm water for a few minutes to soften. Stir in 20g of flour (organic is best as it contains more natural yeasts) and 20g of water. Cover and let it sit for 24 hours in a warm spot.

Day 2

Stir in 25g flour and 25g of lukewarm water, cover and let it sit for another 24 hours in the same place.

Day 3

Stir in 50g more of flour and 50g of lukewarm water. Within 12 – 24 hours you should see bubbles appearing and it should start to smell a bit fruity.

Day 4

Stir in 100 grams of flour and 100 grams of lukewarm water. Within about 12 hours you should have a lively starter that is ready for baking

Maintaining the white starter

Continue to build the starter with daily feedings until you have a quantity to use for baking.

Aim to have 200 – 300g of starter available.

You can double or triple the quantity of starter with each feeding (I usually feed mine with 100g each of flour and water). Feeding with approximately equal weights of flour and water gives good consistency which should be similar to porridge. Add a splash more flour or water if required. If you don’t know when you’re next going to be baking, store the starter in the fridge and feed it every few days. Tip half of the starter away and then feed it as normal.

Here’s a handy guide for when to feed your starter:   should-i-feed-my-sourdough-starter

Make sure you use a starter that has been fed in the last 24 hours when baking.

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The starter usually "peaks" about 3-4 hours after a feed.
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